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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:32 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
Posts: 403
Location: Perth, Western Australia
A few months later all was complete and with the locked center diff it made the car a bit of a fun to drive, the inside rear wheel would skip if turning at low speed or if trying to reverse and turn, the inside front wheel would drag. It did cause no end of a confusing looks at petrol stations from the local bogan’s.

I entered Motovation 21 at Perth Motorplex with Old School Toys and apart from the blazing heat it was an amazing experience.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t enter any events as the Fuel Pressure Gauge failed, leaking fuel everywhere and the car would overheat if it wasn’t getting enough air flow through the radiator.

At the time, I thought the overheating was probably the dodgy super cheap slim line fans.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:33 am 
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
First mod post Motovation was improving the Brakes. Standard Cyborgs run a Single Piston front and rears but they just don’t slow the car down quickly enough, especially now it has double the power of the stock motor.
The obvious move is to install the VR4 braking system as its meant for a heavier car with similar amount of power – this is exactly what I did.
CB Lancers and by extension, Cyborgs run a captive front rotor and there isn’t any option to increase the size of the rotor from 236mm to the VR4 sized 276mm.

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Removing the rotor also means breaking apart the whole hub assembly which means you may as well replace the hub bearings at the same time. Bugger.

Thankfully a friend had been down this path before and the remedy is to disassemble the hub, replace the bearings and machine down the stub axle to fit inside the VR4 rotor.

This is the stub axle, effectively I need to have about 3mm machined off the outer edge for it then to fit inside the VR4 rotor. This then turns the front braking system into a floating disk.

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Now some might be wondering why I don’t use a whole VR4 hub assembly? Good question grass hopper.

The problem with swapping the whole hubs over if that the geometry is different and the mounting point for the steering arm is upside down, this all impacts handling and gives the car a tendency to tramline over any bump, not something I really wanted.

Once the stub axle has been turned down it slots easy inside the rotor, problem solved? Nearly, but now the rotor is effectively offset by the rotor hub face thickness, which means the caliper is no longer centered with the disc. In the end, all that’s needed is some 6mm spacers behind the calipers to bring everything back into alignment.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:35 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
VR4 Brake conversion all completed, I ran a seal kit through the front and rear calipers while at it.

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With the new rotors and calipers, combined with a re-sleaved 1” VR4 brake master cylinder and the car finally stops reasonably well. It still feels like it needs a larger booster ratio as you still really need to step on the brakes to start hauling up – buts its much improved over standard.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:36 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
A month or so after doing the brakes I noticed a couple of drips of gearbox oil on the driveway. It seemed the 5th gear retaining nut had back out and cracked the end of the gearbox housing.

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A quick torque up again and a bigger hit with the hitting stick on the 5th gear nut crush points seemed to solve it for the time.

A benefit of transverse mounted engine is that it is easy to replace the front gearbox cover, just jack the car up, take off the driver’s side wheel and there it is.

Now as luck would have it, when you own an odd ball car, owner’s kind of group together and someone not too far away from me had two KM221 gearboxes for sale with transfer cases, these are the standard Cyborg gearboxes with the 2.844 ratio diffs.

I borrowed one of the front covers from the gearboxes I had just collected, problem solved.

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If you recall earlier in the thread I mentioned I had a habit of launching the car, well I had been itching to try this “stutter box” out and… well… when I did;

1. The output shaft of the transfer case snapped off.
2. A whole bunch of teeth on the rear diff crown wheel were ripped off.

Seems the on/off nature of the twin plate clutch and fused center diff attacked the next weakest links in the driveline.

It still drove that broken though, with the locked center diff it was just and open diff front wheel drive and it sucked, it would fry the front single wheel in 4th very easily and was basically unusable.

Thankfully though, I had a spare transfer from the gearboxes I picked up earlier and I also managed to source a 2.844 ratio rear mechanical LSD off retardme.co.nz, I’ve never heard of one let alone seen one for sale, score!

Speaking of ratios, VR4s/RVRs and Evo 1-3’s share a common set of rear diff ratios, 3.547, 3.909 or 3.312 for some Auto’s. The diff ratio doesn’t equate to the total final drive though as there is also a primary reduction ratio of 1.275 in the gearbox and a further 1.090 ratio in the transfer case which brings the total final drive 4.929 for 3.5’s and 5.433 for 3.9’s. Where am I going with this?

Well the pre-1990 Cyborg’s were the only series that had a 2.844 rear diff ratio and this is because they used a KM221 gearbox which has a different primary reduction ratio of 1.640. With the transfer case ratio of 1.090 this brings the total final drive to 5.084 very similar to a standard VR4’s.

Anyway, I digress, I put the spare transfer case in and swapped in the new rear LSD and it was good.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:37 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
For about a month, then I kept on hitting ignition breakdown, it would just start running on 2 cylinders, which in a wasted spark setup points to a coil. I swapped in multiple different coils, changed out Power Transistor Units (Ignitors), probed the loom looking for issues but I just couldn’t keep the car running reliably, it seemed to be spitting coils for some reason.

Looking back at it now, this is where I think most sane people should have stopped and just maintained/fixed and enjoyed the car, but I must have been dropped on my head when I was a baby as I continued tipping money into this thing at an increasing rate.

I cracked the shits at the ignition problem and then this happened.

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Innovate LC-1, Link Plus G3 with wire in loom, 7 bar Map Sensor, Dual – Twin Ignitors and a Jaycar kit to make a set of “Det Cans”.

I bought the Link Plus G3 a few months before the G4 was released, but thankfully the hardware is the same in the G3 and you can unlock the same features as the G4 with a $150 software unlock.

And so, begins the next round of mods, my solution to the ignition problem…

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:39 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
At this time, I also pulled the engine and gearbox out again, this was so I can get rid of the twin plate clutch and put something in that would actually act as a fuse on the driveline, rather than the murderer.

It was also a suitable time to swap in a gearbox that didn’t have a welded center diff.

I didn’t drop in a standard gearbox though, I modified the center diff off one of the gearboxes I scored earlier for a 4-spider center. This is a rather simple mod that almost doubles the power holding of the center diff and also helps a little with shocking load capability.

The mod is straight forward you machine the cross bar down… (machined left, standard right)

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…and then slide a set of additional spider gears on and machine a small amount off the side of the center diff housing.

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It was fairly expensive machining the crossbar as it was hardened tool steel but a local tool sharpener was more than happy to have a crack and he did a magic job.

All bolted together an installed into another good gearbox.

I’ve kept the gearbox with the locked centre for another time.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:40 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
Posts: 403
Location: Perth, Western Australia
I replaced the twin plate with a Fidanza Aluminium flywheel, sintered puck friction plate and a something/something pressure plate – yes, I obviously had not learned anything from the twin plate fiasco.

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I got to thinking about why Mitsubishi rotated the engine and gearbox 180deg in the Evo 4+, common reasoning is that it removes a shaft in the gearbox.

Earlier models need 3 shafts, Input, Intermediate and Output whereas the Evo 4+ have only an Input and Intermediate.

Or perhaps it’s so if the flywheel explodes it takes the passengers nads out and not the drivers.

Hrmm, think I need a scatter shield.

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Actually, I need a polished scatter shield.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:41 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
Posts: 403
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Next minute these goodies arrived. A set of Brian Crower 280 degree duration cams, matching heavy duty valve springs, titanium retainers, Fidanza cam gears, ARP head studs and ARP rod bolts.

Totally over kill for a standard short block but, you know, why not right?

Matchstick for scale, tissues for clean-up.

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To install the valve springs, it was easiest to take the head off for a freshen up. I used a local machining shop to clean up the head, skim, check the valve seats, install new guide seals, springs and retainers.

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Next up was a Cometic Multi Layered Steel Head Gasket along with the ARP head studs. Brian Crower recommend the 280’s to be installed straight up but at the time I didn’t have a dial indicator to check for actual Top Dead Center of the Pistons since the head and gasket height were different now.

I have since checked with a dial indicator and it’s just under half a degree out, not enough for me to worry about cracking the Loctite on the cam gears retaining nuts.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:42 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
Posts: 403
Location: Perth, Western Australia
And another turn for the project, a local was selling this low km turbo and I had to impulse buy! Unfortunately, the standard unit of measurement, the Nokia phone was unavailable, I had to substitute with another period correct device.

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It’s a PTE SCM 6152E, in hindsight it’s a complete ass of a turbo, but it’s a bolt-on to the Mitsubishi mounting flange and well, bigger is better, right?

Apparently its rated for 630hp, with a 3.5” Inlet, 56 trim compressor wheel with an Inducer of 61mm and Exducer of 82mm. What really lets it down is the custom rear housing made by PTE to suit the Mitsubishi flange and the 76 trim T350 turbine.

But what’s done is done. :-)


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:43 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
With a bigger turbo, you need bigger injectors and I picked up a set of second hand SARD 800cc injectors and had them cleaned before installing.

What’s annoying about these injectors is SARD don’t offer any decent specifications on them, just a vague Dead/Lag Time of 1.1ms, like at what voltage and fuel pressure?

It turns out that at 3 bar fuel pressure these are closer to 855cc. Not quite enough for corn juice, but that wasn’t even available in West Australia when I was building this.

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Getting ahead a little here, but I recently purchased an oscilloscope and measured the actual dead time on the car while it was running. The Hantek DSO 6074BE IV is a kit specific for cars and makes testing this stuff easy. I varied the voltage by turning on ancillaries, disconnecting the alternator and running on battery power etc. then used a non-linear extrapolation to get the lower voltages.

At standard operating voltages, the dead times are now exact and much closer at the lower voltages.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:44 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
I dummied the engine up on the engine stand to see how much additional clearance would be needed on the water pump inlet pipe which runs behind the turbo, fortunately none was needed.

I also gave the exhaust manifold a heat wrap in the hope it would help with the overheating the car had while sitting at traffic lights. On a stock car, there would be some heat shielding on the manifolds and dump pipes and maybe with the tighter engine bay in the Cyborg compared to the VR4, the unwrapped manifold may have been radiating too much heat into the bay for the near stock cooling system to dissipate. It couldn’t hurt, right?

One of the other changes here was that the oil feed for the turbo could not come from the stock location in the head as the oil pressure at this point is too low, PTE recommend taking the oil straight from the filter housing which is as close to max pressure you can get.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
In a semi-serious continuing effort to stop the overheating when stationary on hot days I thought about adding some bonnet vents and in my opinion, the only ones that would be correct for the car are VR4 RS vents. I did consider some Evo 3 bonnet vents but I just didn’t think it would work right as they are much larger.

I was pretty nervous doing those first few cuts into the bonnet, but in the end, it came up okay, not perfect but good enough.

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I did plenty of measuring to find the right spot for the vents in the bonnet, I’m not using the best position for heat extraction, but rather a position that is as close to where the vents sit on a standard VR4 RS bonnet. This puts the vents half over the radiator support and half over the exhaust manifold.

With liberal amounts of Sikaflex I glued the vents into the bonnet and even after 8 years there has been no sign of movement.

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I went to super cheap and got them to mix up and rattle can of the standard paint and it turned out awesome.

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Until I applied the clear to them which made them go a milky colour. *sigh* I ended on masking them up and painting them satin black recently.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:46 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
I put the engine back in the car with the new clutch, gearbox, turbo. I had also entered into a group buy for some custom Front & Rear Strut braces which I finally got to test fit.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:48 am 
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CSM Junkie
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
Remember how the handling was pretty bad because of the shortened rear King Springs I installed?

I bought a set of G4’s for a VR4, taking a gamble that I could adjust enough height out the rear to get the Cyborg sitting right.

This wasn’t the case and the rears were far too tall but the G4 dealer in Australia was more than happy to help in customising the coil overs to work.

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I sent the rears back with some measurements and this was what the result is, one very shortened rear coil over which worked!

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Some of you might be thinking, “But G4’s are cheap shite” and, well yea they’re not the best, but they are light years better than what was there previously.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:49 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2006 9:44 pm
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
There is a slight difference in the way the front suspension mounts between the VR4 and Cyborg. You can see in the picture above the standard front VR4 top hat is mounted with three studs and the Cyborg is mounted with 2 studs. The two stud tops hat do look similar to the later model CC Lancer/Evo 1-3 but it’s not quite the same.

This meant I needed a custom top hat made.

This was actually quite fun to do, we put the standard top hat onto a flatbed scanner to get the profile, did the same with the G4 top hat then superimposed to two together to get a CAM profile for the CNC router.

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All bolted in perfectly, like it was meant to be.

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